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Thread: Supposed WWII skeleton found dangling above Kokoda Track

  1. #1

    Default Supposed WWII skeleton found dangling above Kokoda Track

    Interesting story and comments about it

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2...28/2348489.htm
    Some see the glass as half empty, some see it as half full. I see a glass that's too big.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Supposed WWII skeleton found dangling above Kokoda Track

    You sure that's not a Sasquatch...................?

    Seriously. Its been 63 years minimum. Any "body" would have long since deteriated such that it would have fallen from the tree. This IS Papua New Guinea - where the clothes on your back will deteriate and fall off you while on a 5m trek between villages. Just ask the Aussie and NZ survivors. This really needs forensic confirmation - otherwise its a hoax.

    "War has a grim purpose and is extremely complex. Sophisticated planning and doctrine are present at every level. Yet at the point of fire battle is the essence of chaos and violence."

  3. #3

    Default Re: Supposed WWII skeleton found dangling above Kokoda Track

    Quote Originally Posted by 352ndOscar
    You sure that's not a Sasquatch...................?

    Seriously. Its been 63 years minimum. Any "body" would have long since deteriated such that it would have fallen from the tree. This IS Papua New Guinea - where the clothes on your back will deteriate and fall off you while on a 5m trek between villages. Just ask the Aussie and NZ survivors. This really needs forensic confirmation - otherwise its a hoax.

    Sheesh ! Talk about shooting the messenger olice:

    Supposed WWII skeleton
    Skeleton, not body.

    :-X from here on
    Some see the glass as half empty, some see it as half full. I see a glass that's too big.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Supposed WWII skeleton found dangling above Kokoda Track

    Some feedback from another forum.

    The Kokoda track was a frightful spot to fight in. However, the Japanese were not stopped from invading Aust there. It was a diversionary tactic by them to distract from a seaborne invasion of Port Moersby. Which was stopped by the USA with the battle of the Coral Sea.

    They landed some 10,000 men on the northern coast of New Guinea and set off over the challenging Kokoda Track. They were initially met by ill trained Australian conscripts. 'Chockos' short for chocolate soldiers. Terrible things happened until the Japanese soldiers overstretched their supply line and were pushed back. One battalion of 'Chocko's' the 39th I think held together and received the title 'Ragged Bloody Heroes'. Mind you it was still disbanded by the Aust high command who displayed none of the understanding of the 1st AIF command during the WW1.

    Anyhow the losses of Australian soldiers on the Kokoda track was around 500. About the same as lost in Vietnam and also at Korea. I do not wish to under state the sacrifice by those poor bloody infantry but I do find the chest beating ravings of many Australians over the Kokoda Track to be tiresome.

    regards snooper (from Australia)
    Some see the glass as half empty, some see it as half full. I see a glass that's too big.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Supposed WWII skeleton found dangling above Kokoda Track

    Trapper,

    Please do not mistake my sceptical comments as shooting the messenger. I've done a lot of research into the "Papuan Campaign" and familiarity with the subject might have tainted my comments.

    This was a critical and important time in the war as "we" were still reeling from the events of Pearl Harbor and the loss of the Phillipines. There was NO immediate help forthcoming from the states so basically, "we" were on our own to stop Japan from taking New Guinea and Port Moresby. The Coral Sea battle only blunted their overall strategy - it didn't stop it.

    If you want to learn more, I suggest you start here: New Guinea.

    After that, if your appetite is still unsettled, let me know. I have over 23MB of compiled data on these events.

    Good Luck!!




    "War has a grim purpose and is extremely complex. Sophisticated planning and doctrine are present at every level. Yet at the point of fire battle is the essence of chaos and violence."

  6. #6

    Default Re: Supposed WWII skeleton found dangling above Kokoda Track

    I just yankin' yer chain 'bout difference 'tween body and skelton (hip bone connected to the thigh bone....... ;D)

    No offense takin' given and taken ;D

    but some other comments, then "the rest of the story" as Paul Harvey would say.

    Chances of that being a WW2 body are pretty slim... Legs and arms would have dropped off in 3 months... I would be amazed if that body was 66 years old... By the way put a ww2 parachute in a tree and come back in 20 years and see what's left of it.

    Were synthetic fibers used in any of the rig?

    Natural fibers would be long-gone fast.

    If it is a pilot in that tree then I would guess he is American, or at least Allied. To my knowledge the Axis powers did not have Nylon, which would have been the only truly synthetic fiber at the time. Nylon first appeared in the US in 1939 and Dupont scrambled to find a way to use it to replace silk in parachutes, which they succeeded in doing just in time for the silk rationing.

    From the wikipedia entry on Nylon:

    Bill Pittendreigh, DuPont, and other individuals and corporations worked diligently during the first few months of World War II to find a way to replace Asian silk with nylon in parachutes. It was also used to make tires, tents, ropes, ponchos, and other military supplies. It was even used in the production of a high-grade paper for U.S. currency. At the outset of the war, cotton accounted for more than 80% of all fibers used and manufactured, and wool fibers accounted for the remaining 20%. By August 1945, manufactured fibers had taken a market share of 25% and cotton had dropped.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7599398.stm

    'have a nice day mate !
    Some see the glass as half empty, some see it as half full. I see a glass that's too big.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
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    Default Re: Supposed WWII skeleton found dangling above Kokoda Track

    Trap, my dad was a parachute rigger with the USMC during WWII. That man could make a parachute from scratch, and spoke many times of making silk pajamas for the nurses out of the surveyed chutes. Irwin was the main provider of parachutes to the USMC and the canopies were made of silk.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Supposed WWII skeleton found dangling above Kokoda Track

    Quote Originally Posted by 352ndBlacky
    Trap, my dad was a parachute rigger with the USMC during WWII. That man could make a parachute from scratch, and spoke many times of making silk pajamas for the nurses out of the surveyed chutes. Irwin was the main provider of parachutes to the USMC and the canopies were made of silk.
    Thanks for that personal story. That's the kind of thing worth remembering, mentioning here, and being proud of.....your Dad.

    So it turned out to be just a tree branch that had cracked and hung down.

    An educational thread at best.

    Trap
    Some see the glass as half empty, some see it as half full. I see a glass that's too big.

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