README - Pe-2 Peshka v.4.05m
Il-2 Sturmovik: Forgotten battles - Ace Expansion Pack - Pacific Fighters series

1C:Maddox Games, Ubisoft and Ilya Shevchenko are proud to present the Petlyakov Pe-2 bomber to the virtual pilots of the world. The little bomber affectionately known as the “Peshka” (Pawn) is the most famous Soviet twin-engine bomber of the war. It was to the twin-engines what the Il-2 was to the single-engines. Extremely versatile, the Pe-2 served in virtually any role imaginable: dive- and level bomber, heavy fighter, night fighter, reconnaissance, and more. Over 20 different modifications were produced during the war, with a total of 11,000 built. The Peshka served from the summer of 1941 well into the Cold War, where it received a NATO reporting name “Buck”.

Missions

95 Campaign Missions
5 Single Missions
5 Multi-Player Cooperative Missions

New Flyable Aircraft

Pe-2, 1940 (1 series)
Pe-2, 1942 (84 series)
Pe-2, 1942 (110 series)
Pe-2, 1944 (359 series)
Pe-3, 1941
Pe-3 bis, 1941

New Ground Vehicles and Objects

61-K 37mm AAG
Flak 37
Flak 18 88mm AAG
SdKfz6 with Flak 37
Demag D7 with Flak 38
Demag D7
SdKfz6
ZiS-3 76,2 mm Div gun
Soviet 122mm Hovitzer
ML-20 155mm gun
PAK-40 75mm ATG
Dummy Flak
Dummy Gun
Dummy Plane
Dummy Tank

Notes:

1. Waist Gunners.
The third crewman in the Pe-2 bomber, officially known as the gunner-radioman, was one of the busiest men in aviation history. In addition to manning the radio, he also had to man three separate defensive positions: the left waist gun, the right waist gun, and the bottom gun. Often he would be given only one gun, which he would need to move from socket to socket as threats shifted. In a few recorded cases, the gunners would open the top hatch, stand up, and fire the machine gun off-the-hip, Hollywood style.

Unfortunately, the Il-2 / FB / PF code was never intended for a single crewman alternating between firing positions. In Pe-2’s cause we would not be able to prevent the AI from, for example, firing the bottom gun while the player fired the left waist. Due to these limitations and in order to keep a level playing field, the waist gunner in all Pe-2s will always be controlled by AI.

The Pe-2 and Pe-3 are no different from other flyable bombers on all other respects.

2. Some PCs made by the Northwood Computers company may experience performance issues when running the game in the Perfect graphics mode. Due to issues outside of our control, the machines may lock up. Therefore, we do not recommend running the game in the Perfect mode.

In certain cases, the lock ups may be prevented by renaming the il2_core.DLL file into il2_coreP4.DLL. The files are located in the root Il-2 folder. Important: when renaming the files, make sure to save a back-up copy of the original il2_core.DLL.

Using the OPB-1 bombsight

1. Prior making the bomb run, bombing altitude and aircraft speed must be entered into the bombsight. The true distance from the target to the plane can be entered using the Increase Bombsight Altitude and Decrease Bombsight Altitude keys. Input the plane speed using the Increase Bombsight Velocity and Decrease Bombsight Velocity keys. Note that the true (not indicated) airspeed must be set (it can be obtained from the speed gauge when in No-Cockpit View mode). Plane angle of drift should be entered using Adjust Sight Control to Left and Adjust Sight Control to Right keys.

Use the Toggle Gunsight control key (Shift-F1 by default) to lean to the bombsight lenses. The plane should be in level flight. While the plane is positioned horizontally, the bubble visible in the bombsight lenses should be in the centre of the reticule.

Use the Increase Bombsight Distance and Decrease Bombsight Distance keys to adjust the crosshair position so the “U-mark” and the triangle mark match on the bombsight scale. Bomb trigger should be pressed when the target passes the centre of the bombsight reticule.

2. Look for the special training mission in “Trainings” menu.

Static Campaigns

Attention!

We strongly recommend starting the campaign in the rank designated in the Campaign Information screen, which you see before beginning. This way you’ll be able to control one or more wingmen. If you start the campaign in a different rank, your position in a multi-plane flight may not be the one intended by the mission authors.

With default settings, landing at the home field is one of the mission objectives; that is, when flying the campaign, you will be required to land successfully after each and every mission. We recommend turning off the “No Instant Success” option in the game’s realism menu, which will allow you to continue onto the next mission even if you are forced to crash-land or bail out in the course of the mission.

Campaign Descriptions

"Pe-2. Front Lines"

Timeframe: July of 1943 – May of 1945.
Country: USSR
Location: USSR Central Front; 1st Byelorussian Front.
Available Planes: Pe-2 / 84, / 110 and / 359.
Number of Missions: 25.

You are a Soviet Senior Lieutenant, squadron commander flying a Pe-2 dive bomber for the 779th Bomber Regiment, 241st Bomber Division. During the campaign you will take part in the defensive and offensive operations leading up to the famous Battle of Kursk, and also the final defeat of Nazi Germany during the battle of Berlin in the spring of 1945.

"Pe-2. Navy Bomber"

Timeframe: April of 1944 – February of 1945.
Country: USSR
Location: Finnish Gulf; Baltic States.
Available Planes: Pe-2 / 359.
Number of Missions: 20.

The campaign showcases the battles fought by the 73rd Dive Bomber Regiment of the Red Banner Baltic Fleet which, in the spring of 1944, was renamed the 12th Guards Dive Bomber Regiment of the Red Banner Baltic Fleet. You will fly for the squadron from April to June of 1944, taking part in attacks on German convoys and naval bases in the Finnish Gulf, as well as missions from September of 1944 to February of 1945, when the regiment fought over Latvia and the Baltic Sea.

"Blinding Sun"

Timeframe: January of 1942 – June of 1943.
Country: USSR
Location: USSR Western Front; Central Front.
Available Planes: MiG-3UD, Yak-1B.
Number of Missions: 30.

You are a MiG-3 pilot, a young Soviet Lieutenant just appointed a squadron leader of the 519th Fighter Regiment, 47th Mixed Air Division. As part of a battered understrength regiment you will face cold-blooded German aces in the air, dominated by the Luftwaffe and fight overwhelming odds to complete your objective – or face a court martial. Poor planning, intrigues by superior officers, shortage of basic supplies, adverse weather and deaths of comrades – all of these factors add even more to the already desperate situation…. A year and a half after the campaign starts you will be a seasoned ace in a brand new Yak fighter, teaching fresh flight school graduates how to survive over the Kursk Salient.

"Burning Ridge"

Timeframe: August – September of 1944.
Country: USSR
Location: Eastern-Carpathian campaign, 4th Ukrainian Front.
Available Planes: Il-2 Type 3, Il-2 Type 3M.
Number of Missions: 20.

The campaign showcases the Soviet ground attack aviation during the famous “Stalin’s ten strikes”. The Eastern Carpathian campaign was incredibly complex in terms of demands placed on the Soviet air force. Il-2 Sturmoviks flew in poor weather over treacherous mountains, facing superior enemy forces defended by walls of flak. You will fly for one of the regiments facing those odds, the 525th Sturmovik Regiment of the 227th Sturmovik Air Division.

Credits

Oleg Maddox and 1C:Maddox Games

Lead Developer
Ilya Shevchenko

Lead Modeler
Vladimir Kochmarsky

Pe-2 Cockpits
Andrei Muratov

Campaigns Created by
Vadim Davydov

Campaigns Tested by
Aleksandr Timoshkov

New Skins by
Aleksandr Timoshkov

Sources

1) Mironov N.F. In pursuit of the horizon. - St. Petersburg: Oblik Publishing House, 2004.
2) Major General Tolstoy V.M., et al. One hundred Stalin's Falcons. - Moscow: Yauza Publishing House, 2005.
3) Beshanov V.V. Stalin's Ten Punches. - Minsk: Kharvest, 2004.
4) Beshanov V.V. 1942 - The Training Year. - Minsk: Kharvest, 2003.
5) Drabkina A. I battled in the Il-2. - Moscow: Yauza, Eksmo, 2005.
6) Borisov Yu. Focke-Wulfe Fw 190A. - Moscow: Eksprint Publishing Center, 2005.
7) Borisov Yu. Focke-Wulfe Fw 190F/G. - Moscow: Eksprint Publishing Center, 2005.
8) Vestsik Milos. Lavockin La-7. - MBI, Praha, 2000.
9) Khazanov D.B. Unknown battles in the Moscow Skies, 1941 - 1942. The Counterattack. - Moscow: "Technika - Molodezhi", 2001.
10) Mariinskiy YE.P. I fought in the Airacobra. - Moscow: Yauza, Eksmo, 2005.
11) Various authors. History of World War II, 1939 - 1945, in twelve volumes. - Moscow: Voenizdat, 1976.
12) Golubyov V.F. In the Name Of Leningrad. - Moscow: FAIR- PRESS, 2000.
13) Various authors. Salient of Fire. - Moscow: "Belfry- mH", 2003.
14) Zephyrs M.T. Luftwaffe Attack Aircraft. - Moscow: OOO "PUBLISHING HOUSE AST", 2002.
15) Zephyrs M.T. Luftwaffe Aces: Day Fighters. In two volumes. - Moscow: OOO "PUBLISHING HOUSE AST", 2002.
16) Various authors, edited by Chris Bishop. Air warfare of the 20th century (1911-1945). - Smolensk: Rusich, 2002.
17) Rudenko S.I. Wings Of victory. - Moscow: International relations, 1985.
18) Fedorov A. g. Air Power in the Battle of Moscow. Publication 2- e, corrected and augmented. - Moscow: Publishing house "Nauka", 1975.
19) Various authors. Historical overview of the Battles of 16th Air Army (1942-1945). - Moscow: Voenizdat, 1973.
20) Vorozheykin A.V. Soldiers of the Sky: Fighter Pilot Stories. - Moscow: Voenizdat, 1986.
21) Mikhaylik YA.D. Family of Falcons. - Moscow: Voenizdat, 1971.
22) Gubin B.A., Kiselev V.D. The Eighth Air Army in World War II. - Moscow: Voenizdat, 1980.
23) Romanov M. 4. Sturmoviks over the Carpathians. - Moscow: Voenizdat, 1989.
24) Zholudev L.V. Squadron of Steel. - Moscow: Voenizdat, 1972.
25) Fedorov A G. Dive Bombers In the Air! - Moscow: DOSAAF, 1986.
26) Various authors. Russian Archives: Battle for Berlin (the Red Army in defeated Germany): Vol. 15 (4--5). - Moscow: Terra, 1995.
27) Tsupko P.I., Dive-Bombers. - Moscow: Politizdat, 1987.
28) Ivanov P. N. Wings over the Sea. - Moscow: Voenizdat, 1973.

© 2006 Ubisoft. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006 1С. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006 1C:Maddox Games. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006 Ilya Shevchenko. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006 V. Davydov. All Rights Reserved.


README - Sturmoviks over Manchuria v.4.06m

Il-2 Sturmovik: Forgotten battles - Ace Expansion Pack - Pacific Fighters series

Oleg Maddox, Ilya Shevchenko and Ubisoft are proud to present the next add-on in the series that started in 2001 with Il-2 Sturmovik. Sturmoviks over Manchuria covers very different aspects of WWII under the same roof, offering such varied possibilities as the Soviet-Japanese conflict at Khalhin Gol in 1939, Japanese defense of Iwo Jima in 1944, and Soviet assault on Berlin in the spring of 1945.

The add-on finally models the long-awaited one true heir to the series namesake, the Il-10 Sturmovik. Other new planes include the A-20C bomber, one of the chief attack aircraft of the early war that saw attack with virtually every Allied air force; and seven new Japanese fighters and three Japanese bombers that range from the Ki-27 Nate, the plane that fought against the Flying Tigers in 1941, to the N1K2 George and J2M5 Jack, the two most advanced Japanese fighters of WWII.

The add-on presents all those aircraft in two large static campaigns that cover such wide-ranging topics as the Japanese defense of Iwo Jima, Soviet use of the IL-10 against the Third Reich over Berlin, and against the Japanese Kwantung Army over Manchuria.

Missions

2 new static campaigns totaling 45 misions
5 single missions
5 co-op missions

New Flyable Planes:

А-20С, 1941
IL-10, 1945
Ki-27 Ko, 1938
Ki-27 Otsu, 1938
Ki-43-II, 1942
Ki-43-II Kai, 1943
J2M5, 1944
N1K2-Ja, 1944

New AI Planes:

A5M4, 1938
B6N2, 1943
Ki-21-I, 1937
Ki-21-II, 1940

New Maps:

Manchuria
Khalkin-Gol (Nomonhan)
Burma

Also:

300 new paintschemes*
4 B&W intro tracks


* The add-on also includes over 300 custom-made skins. These are used extensively on AI aircraft in campaigns to add more variety to the planes the player encounters mission to mission. Vast majority of the skins are 100% historical, based on period photographs of individual WWII planes, with details like the overall paintscheme, style, size and positions of markings, tactical codes, and others all replicated.

For many of the aircraft, such as the J2M5, N1K2-J, and Ki-27, individual paintschemes are created modeling virtually every squadron that historically flew these planes. Hundreds of unique historical
squadron paintschemes are also recreated for other aircraft.

Hypothetical paintschemes for online play are also included, such as Luftwaffe paintschemes for Soviet aircraft, USAAF paintschemes for Japanese planes, etc. All of these are also based on historical paintschemes, with all details authentic for each given airforce.

List of Custom Paintschemes (excluding the void templates):

A5M4: 4 paintschemes
B-29: 16 paintschemes
B6N2: 2 paintschemes
F6F-5: 2 paintschemes
IL-2M3: 18 paintschemes
Il-10: 27 paintschemes
J2M5: 21 paintschemes
Ki-27 Ko: 31 paintschemes
Ki-27 Otsu: 65 paintschemes
La-5FN: 23 paintschemes
La-7: 20 paintschemes
N1K2-J: 9 paintschemes
P-47D-27: 12 paintschemes
Tu-2s: 7 paintschemes
Yak-3: 30 paintschemes
Yak-9D: 40 paintschemes

Notes:

1. Khalkin-Gol is a non-historical map, imitating the battle area but moving the involved airfields much closer together (real distances were often in the hundreds of kilometers). The map is intended both for online and offline play.

2. In order to offer more gameplay variety, the Manchuria map also includes the city of Mudanjiang, one of the main targets of the Soviet advance in the area. In actuality the city is well beyond the western edge of the map.

3. Some PCs made by the Northwood Computers company may experience performance issues when running the game in the Perfect graphics mode. Due to issues outside of our control, the machines may lock up. Therefore, we do not recommend running the game in the Perfect mode.

In certain cases, the lock ups may be prevented by renaming the il2_core.DLL file into il2_coreP4.DLL. The files are located in the root Il-2 folder. Important: when renaming the files, make sure to save a back-up copy of the original il2_core.DLL.

Pilot Notes

Supercharger and Fuel Mixture.
The “complex engine management” difficulty settings must be On. If the “complex engine management” parameter is set to Off, supercharger and fuel mixture are managed automatically in all aircraft.

Several aircraft in our flight simulator require additional control when flying with Complex Engine Management option on. Many WWII engines were equipped with superchargers, devices that kept engines running at optimal power at higher altitudes. Without the superchargers, lower oxygen content at high altitude would have caused the engines to lose most of their power. As most supercharged engines in WWII did not have automatic supercharger control, they needed to be adjusted manually. The supercharger stage is adjusted using Supercharger Next Stage and Supercharger Prev. Stage control keys.

Most of the aircraft also requires adjustment of fuel mixture at altitude. Above certain altitude, most engine carburetors become incapable of producing optimal mixture due to the lower density air. If your engine begins trailing smoke and suffers power loss or RPM instability, adjust the mix level (using Increase Mixture and Decrease Mixture control keys) until the engine returns to the regular output.

Important: Failure to properly adjust supercharger stages or fuel mixture when Complex Engine Management is enabled will lead to poor aircraft performance.

Important: When descending from high altitudes to lower altitudes, do not forget to adjust your supercharger stage and/or mixture back to the lower-altitude settings. Flying at low altitudes with high-altitude supercharger stages or fuel mixture will lead to poor aircraft performance and/or in-flight accidents.

A-20C

The aircraft is equipped with a two-stage supercharger.
Supercharger Stage 1 (default) should be used between 0 and 2,200 meters
Supercharger Stage 2 should be used above 2,200 meters

Mixture adjustment is auto.
Il-10

The aircraft is equipped with a single-step supercharger, therefore no pilot intervention is needed.

Mixture adjustment is requires at 6,600 meters.
J2M5

The aircraft is equipped with a three-stage supercharger.
Supercharger Stage 1 (default) should be used between 0 and 3,000 meters
Supercharger Stage 2 should be used between 3,000 and 5,500 meters
Supercharger Stage 3 should be used above 5,500 meters

Mixture adjustment is requires at 6,000 meters.

Ki-27

The aircraft is equipped with a single-step supercharger, therefore no pilot intervention is needed.

Mixture adjustment is requires at 6,000 meters.

N1K2-J

The aircraft is equipped with a two-stage supercharger.
Supercharger Stage 1 (default) should be used between 0 and 4,000 meters
Supercharger Stage 2 should be used above 4,000 meters

Mixture adjustment is requires at 6,000 meters.

The NIK2 has an advanced Auto Combat Flap system. When the system was armed (Always armed in this Simulation) the Flaps will deploy to the Combat (High Lift Setting) automatically as a function of G. To prevent nuisance cycling two different G thresholds are used. Auto extension
will occur at 3.5G. Auto retraction will occur when the G is relaxed to less than 2.5G. Auto flap deflection beyond Combat is not possible.

Below the Combat Flap threshold G, Flap operation is manual.


Additional Notes:

Joystick control input was changed in accordance with pilots' wishes.

Static Campaigns

Attention!

We strongly recommend starting the campaign in the rank designated in the Campaign Information screen, which you see before beginning. This way you’ll be able to control one or more wingmen. If you start the campaign in a different rank, your position in a multi-plane flight may not be the one intended by the mission authors.

With default settings, landing at the home field is one of the mission objectives; that is, when flying the campaign, you will be required to land successfully after each and every mission. We recommend turning off the “No Instant Success” option in the game’s realism menu, which will allow you to continue onto the next mission even if you are forced to crash-land or bail out in the course of the mission.

Campaign Descriptions

"Sturmoviks over Manchuria"

Timeframe: April – August of 1945.
Country: USSR
Location: 1st Byelorussian Front, 1st Far East Front
Available Planes: Il-10.
Number of Missions: 25.

You are Captain Sergey Kozlovzev, squadron commander of the 59th Guards ShAP. In January of 1945 your regiment received the new Il-10 Sturmoviks, and after several months of state-side training took part in the Soviet assault on Berlin. Captain Kozlovzev will face a difficult task: to successfully evaluate the battle worthiness of the new sturmovik while flying over the war’s biggest battle.

After fighting over Berlin, Kozlovzev is transferred to the Far East, where the Soviet and Japanese armies are preparing for an imminent outbreak of hostilities.

"Glowing Glory"

Timeframe: June of 1944 – June of 1945.
Country: Japan
Location: Iwo Jima; Kyushu
Available Planes: A6M5b, J2M5, N1K2-Ja.
Number of Missions: 20.

By the summer of 1944 the Japanese island defenses are barely holding. Many crucial battles have not yet been fought, but for Japan the war is already lost. In June of 1944 the 301 Navy Kokutai makes a difficult long flight to Iwo Jima and prepares to defend the tiny island from the aircraft of the US Navy. The Japanese pilots come up against incredible odds… The few that survive are transferred to the home island, to defend Japanese cities and factories from B-29 raids, and roaming fighter-bombers and escort fighters.

Credits

Developed by
Oleg Maddox and 1C:Maddox Games

Lead Developer
Ilya Shevchenko

Lead Modeler
Vladimir Kochmarsky

New Maps
Oleg Rozhentzov
Ilya Shevchenko
Ian Boys

Campaigns Created by
Vadim Davydov
Aleksandr Timoshkov

Campaigns Tested by
Aleksandr Timoshkov

New Skins by
Ilya Shevchenko

Cockpits
A-20C - Ray Gruetzmacher, Filippo Tarquini, Rafael Rodriges
Il-10, Ki-43-II, Ki-43-II Kai - Ray Gruetzmacher, Filippo Tarquini
Ki-27 Ko, Ki-27 Otsu - Mikhail Toshpulatov
N1K2-Ja - Vladimir Kochmarsky
J2M5 – Mikhail Toshpulatov, Vladimir Kochmarsky

External Aircraft Models
A-20C - Rafael Rodriges
Il-10 - Szalay Viktor
Ki-27 Ko, Ki-27 Otsu – Max Dmitriev, Vladimir Kochmarsky
J2M5 - Dani Santos

Special Thanks
Ruy Horta for historical documentation for the N1K2, J2M, Ki-21, and Ki-27.
Burma:
Water map - Geoff Jackmann
Altitude map - Laurent Cunin
2D map/far map - Oleg Rozhentsov
Terrain textures - Clay Swindell, Kevin Tungatt
Localisation - Christian Schulz, Laurent Cunin, Jiří Hubka, Timur Sultan-Zade
Burma Pagoda - EFG_Skat

Sources:

1) General-Major Tolstoy V.M. et al. One Hundred Stalin’s Falcons. – Moscow, Publishing House Yauza, 2005.
2)Drabkin A. I fought in the Il-2. – Moscow, Yauza, Eksmo, 2005.
3)Borisov Yu. FW-190A. – Moscow, OOO «Izdatel'skij centr «Eksprint», 2005.
4)Borisov Yu. FW-190F/G Fighter-Bomber. – Moscow, OOO «Izdatel'skij centr «Eksprint», 2005.
5)Vestsik Mylos'. Lavochkin La-7.– MBI, Praha, 2000.
6) Various authors. History of World War II, 1939 - 1945, in twelve volumes. - Moscow: Voenizdat, 1976.
7) Zephyrs M.T. Luftwaffe Attack Aircraft. - Moscow: OOO "Publishing House AST", 2002.
8) Zephyrs M.T. Luftwaffe Aces: Day Fighters. In two volumes. - Moscow: OOO "Publishing House AST", 2002.
9) Various authors, edited by Chris Bishop. Air warfare of the 20th century (1911-1945). - Smolensk: Rusich, 2002.
10)Haf F., Nichols Ch., Show G. US Marines in the Pacific 1941-1945 gg. - "Izografus", "EKSMO", 2003.
11)Ivanov Yu.G. Kamikaze: suicide pilots. Japanese self-sacrifice in the Pacific. - Smolensk: Rusich, 2003.
12)Horikoshi D., Okumiya M., Kaidin M. "Zero!" Japanese Aviation in WWII. - Moscow, OOO "Publishing House AST", 2003.
13)E. Bivor. Fall of Berlin. 1945. – Moscow, AST: Tranzitkniga, 2005
14)A.B. Shirokorad. Far-East Finale. – Moscow, AST: Tranzitkniga, 2005.
15)Beloborodov A.P. Drive to Harbin. — Moscow, Voenizdat, 1982.
16)Various authors. Russian Archives: Battle for Berlin (the Red Army in defeated Germany): Vol. 15 (4--5). - Moscow: Terra, 1995.
17) Rudenko S.I. Wings of Victory. — Moscow, Mezhdunarodnie otnosheniya, 1985.
18) Chuikov V.I. The End of the Third Reich. — Moscow, Sovetskaya Russia, 1973.
19)Wieliczko L, Szeremeta Z. Nakajima Ki-27 Nate. — Kagero, 2004
20)Ikuhiko Hata, Yasuho Izawa. Japanese Naval Aces & Fighter Units in World War II. Naval Institute Press, 1989
21)Staff of Airview. General View of Japanese Military aircraft in the Pacific War. Kanto-Sha Co, Ltd, 1956
22)R.J. Francillon. Japanese Aircraft of the Pacific War. Funk & Wagnalls, 1970
23)Henry Sakaida & Koji Takaki. Genda’s Blade: Japan’s Squadrons of Aces. 343 Kokutai. Classic, 2003.

© 2006 Ubisoft. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006 1С. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006 1C:Maddox Games. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006 RRG Studios. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006 V. Davydov. All Rights Reserved.


README - '46 - v.4.07m

Il-2 Sturmovik: Forgotten Battles - Ace Expansion Pack - Pacific Fighters series

Features

The final add-on in the Il-2 series, 46, is a door into alternate history. It focuses on hypothetical battles between the Soviet Union and Germany in the year 1946 where WWII still rages on. Both the VVS and Luftwaffe now have access to advanced jet and rocket fighters, and other revolutionary designs that only existed on the drawing board in 1945.

The player will be able to fly such incredible aircraft as the MiG-9 jet fighter, the predecessor to the famous MiG-15 that gained world-wide fame in the Korean War; the Ta-183, a jet fighter designed by Kurt Tank, the creator of the famous FW-190, and the Arado Ar-234 Blitz, the world’s first operation jet bomber.

The add-on will also include a large historical map of the Kiev region, which will be useful both for the 1946 scenarios, as well as modeling the historical battles for Kiev that took place in 1941 and 1944.

Missions

3 new static campaigns totaling 40 missions
5 single missions
5 co-op missions

New Flyable Planes:

Bereznyak-Isaev BI-6
Lavochkin LaGG-3RD
Lavochkin La-7R
Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-9(F-2)
Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-9FS
Mikoyan-Gurevich I-250 (MiG-13)
Yakovlev Yak-3 VK-107A
Yakovlev Yak-3R
Yakovlev Yak-15
Arado Ar-234B Blitz
Heinkel He-L-IIIB-2 Lerche
Kurt Tank Ta-152C
Kurt Tank Ta-183

Special Bonus:

Dornier Do-335V-13
Heinkel He-162C
Heinkel He-162D
Messerschmitt Me-262HG-II

New Map:

Kiev

Also:

386 new paintschemes
84 new ground objects, including trenches
New tanks, SPA and bunkers

Static Campaigns

Attention!

We highly recommend starting all campaigns in the highest possible rank (as recommended in the campaign information). Make sure to select it before starting the campaign – you will not be able to change it while the campaign is in progress. Failing to select the proper rank may not allow you to lead your flight. Although your character in the campaigns may not be given the same rank, the missions are built to put you in control of specific flights.

Most missions have the primary goal of returning and successfully landing onto a specific friendly airfield. If you do not with to be forced to return, and would like to complete missions even if you crash-land or bail-out over friendly territory, please turn off the “No Instant Success” option in the settings. This also should be done prior to starting the campaign.

Campaign Descriptions

"VVS’46"

Timeframe: June – September 1946
Country: USSR
Location: 2nd Ukrainian Front
Available Planes: Yak-15, MiG-9FS.
Number of Missions: 20.

You are commanding a Soviet fighter regiment, recently sent to the rear to study the new Yakovlev Yak-15 jet fighter. The Soviet Union has been at peace with Germany for almost two years now, but there are troubling signs of a build-up on both sides of the border. The new Yak fighter is unexpectedly troublesome, and your squadron is going through the training with difficulty and even casualties. And before the training can complete, you are rapidly transferred to the Kiev border region, where the Soviet Army barely hides the fact that it prepares for war.
You will lead your regiment into the battle virtually unprepared, and flying an unreliable plane. The odds are against you.

"The Rebel"

Timeframe: July 1944 – June 1946
Country: Germany
Location: Berlin ; Kurland
Available Planes: Ar-234B
Number of Missions: 9.

You are Hauptmann Schlammer, a Gruppenkommandeure in command of brand new Arado Blitz jet bombers. Halfway through the familiarization training your gruppe is recalled to Berlin, where you will assist Claus von Stauffenberg and other plotters to overthrow Hitler and set up a new government. Hitler’s assassination is set for July 20th. At least the SS is sure to resist Ludwig Beck and other members of the shadow government when they attempt to take power. Germany is on the brink of a civil war.

"Burning Streak"

Timeframe: 1943 – August 1946
Country: Germany
Location: Kursk; Lvov; Berlin
Available Planes: FW-190; MiG-13; He-162C; Ta-183
Number of Missions: 11.

You’ve been at war for years. All missions are a blur. You barely notice the tracers, explosions, and death screams over the radio. When starting on another routine mission in support of the Battle of Kursk, you could not even imagine that you just started on the path that would lead you to amazing new planes, and that you would become one of Germany’s highest decorated heroes.

Alternate History Timeline

June 6, 1944
D-Day goes very badly due to unexpected bad weather.
Hitler is taken sick and cannot personally intervene in the affairs.

June 8, 1944
Rommel’s concentrated counter-attack by all German units in Western Europe sends the Allies back into the Channel.

June 10, 1944
Last US paratroopers surrender at St Mere Eglise.
European Front is no more.

June 11, 1944
Allies cancel Operation Dragoon (invasion of Southern France in August of 1944)

July 20, 1944
Hitler is killed at Wolfsschanze in Rastenburg by Claus von Stauffenberg’s suitcase bomb.
General Ludwig Beck becomes shadow government’s head of state
Dr. Carl Goerdeler is shadow government’s Chancellor
Sporradic uprising by SS and Gestapo around Berlin begins.
Shadow government requests help from Western Allies.
Most Luftwaffe grounded; some individual pilots make their own choices for whom to support.

July 21, 1944
Western Allies enter temporary cease fire with Germany.
Berlin is fully in Shadow government’s hands.
Goering joins the Shadow government.

July 24, 1944
Himmler is killed in an air attack.
Some SS units begin to join the shadow government.

July 25, 1944
Emergency meeting is held between Stalin, Roosevelt and Churchill in Stockholm.
Churchill wants a conditional surrender. Stalin wants to continue the war. Roosevelt is on the fence.

July 26, 1944
All German military units pledge allegiance to the Shadow government.
Churchill leaves the conference and announces he will seek unilateral peace with the new Germany.
Roosevelt demands that for US to stay in the war with Germany, USSR must declare war on Japan.

July 27, 1944
Several Soviet marshals plead with Stalin to seek peace with Germany

July 28, 1944
Stalin and Roosevelt fail to reach an agreement, and abandon negotiations.
US enters temporary cease-fire with Germany.
Stalin has his peace-seeking marshals executed.

July 29, 1944
Churchill and Goerdeler sign a Peace Pact.
Germany begins to move all units to the Eastern Front.
US and Great Britain begin a colossal operation of moving all European Forces to the Pacific.

August 1, 1944
1st Ukrainian Front’s Sandomierz Operation encounters fresh Panzer armies from the West.

August 3, 1944
1st Ukrainian is thrown back across the Vistula.

August 12, 1944
Crown Prince Wilhelm Hohenzollern is crowned Wilhelm, Kaiser of Germany and King of Prussia

August 23, 1944
Red Army begins the Battle of Romania (Jassy-Chisinau Operation). German strength is over 1 million men.

August 24, 1944
Germany begins a concentrated offensive
Army Group A is aiming towards Kiev
Army Group Center is attacking towards Minsk and Leningrad

August 25, 1944
Army Group A takes Lublin and Przemysl
Army Group Center takes Grodno and Luga
2nd and 4th Ukrainian Fronts are shifted to fight Army Group A
3rd Ukrainian Front begins to retreat

August 28, 1944
2nd and 4th Ukrainian Fronts are surrounded near Vinnitsa between advancing Army Groups A, South and F
Army Group Center is shelling Leningrad

August 30, 1944
German IV Army under Balck enters Kiev
Roosevelt re-enters the scene and offers to mediate peace between USSR and Germany

August 31, 1944
Cease-fire begins on the Eastern Front

September 2, 1944
Stalin meets Kaiser Wilhelm in US-occupied Rome.

September 5, 1944
USSR and Germany sign a Peace Pact. Germany takes Luthiania, Poland, Western part of Ukraine including Kiev, Belarus half-way to Minsk.

April 12, 1945
Franklin D Roosevelt unexpectedly dies. Harry S Truman becomes president.

July 3, 1945
US and British forces invade Kyushu.

August 6, 1945
US drops an atomic bomb on Tokyo

August 9, 1945
US drops an atomic bomb on Kyoto

August 11, 1945
Japan surrenders.
US occupies of all Korea and Manchuria.

June 22, 1946
Soviet Union begins a major offensive along the entire Soviet-German border.

Pilot Notes

Supercharger and Fuel Mixture

The “complex engine management” difficulty settings must be On. If the “complex engine management” parameter is set to Off, supercharger and fuel mixture are managed automatically in all aircraft.

Several aircraft in our flight simulator require additional control when flying with Complex Engine Management option on. Many WWII engines were equipped with superchargers, devices that kept engines running at optimal power at higher altitudes. Without the superchargers, lower oxygen content at high altitude would have caused the engines to lose most of their power. As most supercharged engines in WWII did not have automatic supercharger control, they needed to be adjusted manually. The supercharger stage is adjusted using Supercharger Next Stage and Supercharger Prev. Stage control keys.

Most of the aircraft also requires adjustment of fuel mixture at altitude. Above certain altitude, most engine carburetors become incapable of producing optimal mixture due to the lower density air. If your engine begins trailing smoke and suffers power loss or RPM instability, adjust the mix level (using Increase Mixture and Decrease Mixture control keys) until the engine returns to the regular output.

Important: Failure to properly adjust supercharger stages or fuel mixture when Complex Engine Management is enabled will lead to poor aircraft performance.

Important: When descending from high altitudes to lower altitudes, do not forget to adjust your supercharger stage and/or mixture back to the lower-altitude settings. Flying at low altitudes with high-altitude supercharger stages or fuel mixture will lead to poor aircraft performance and/or in-flight accidents.

BI-6

This plane is powered by three engines: D-1-A-1100 rocket engine in the fuselage (engine #1), and two DM-4-S ramjets on the wingtips (engines #2 and #3).

The wingtip ramjets have independent fuel source stored in the wings. They are effective at speeds above 320 km/h and have limited throttle control. Ramjets offer better fuel economy than the rocket engine, and are used to achieve better range at cruise speed. The main engine is to be used for take-off, acceleration, and maneuvering.

The ramjet engines are engaged / disengaged with the throttle lever. With the throttle at 100%, an engine cannot be shut down; with the throttle at 0% it cannot be turned on. Correspondingly, to control the use of the ramjets, use the engine selection keys to select / deselect the throttle input.

Having the same basic airframe as the BI-1, the aircraft is prone to enter uncontrollable dives at speeds in excess of 800 km/h.

MiG-9 (MiG-9FS)

When using the 57(37)mm cannon above 3,000 meters the gun exhaust may get sucked into the engine air intake. Above 6,000 meters using the cannon is prohibited.
Note: this information is different from what may be found in other sources; however it is based on the pilot operating handbook for the MiG-9.
Please note that the Soviet variant of the BMW-003 used as the engine for the MiG-9 was not a 1-for-1 copy of the venerable German design. Several modifications were made, most importantly the use of advanced alloys which were unavailable in late-war Germany. This greatly increased the reliability and service life of the engine. Also due to the innovative air intake design, the engine temperature was much less of a problem with the MiG-9 than with the German jets.

I-250 (MiG-13)

The tail unit of the aircraft contains a turbojet engine, driven by an extension shaft connected to the main piston engine. The tail engine is used as a regular jet, and has no specific limitations; however it should be used sparingly as it is burns through fuel very quickly (about 10 minutes at cruise power). As such, the jet engine should only be used in combat and other non-routine conditions.
The engine starting procedure is as follows: first start and get the piston engine to low RPM. The jet engine cannot be started otherwise, as it requires the crankshaft to rotate, which is powered by the piston engine. After successfully starting the piston engine, you may engage the jet. If you lose the piston engine due to battle damage or other failures, the jet engine will not operate even if it is completely intact.

Ar 234B

The aircraft has no forward-firing armament. The trigger fires the twin MG-151/20 cannons situated in a stationary tail stinger. They can be fired at any time by pressing the trigger, and can be aimed by pressing the “Toggle Gunsight” button (Shift-F1 by default) when seated in the pilot’s seat. This will switch your view to the telescopic sight located in the cockpit.
The bomb-aiming equipment consists of the Lofte 7K level bombing sight, and the BZA-1 dive-bombing sight. In order to switch to the bombing mode, press the “Pilot or Gunner Position” button (C by default), and use the “Toggle Gunsight” button (Shift-F1 by default) to switch between the dive and level bombing sight optics.

The BZA-1 modeled in the game is simpler than the actual sight used in the Blitz; the details cannot be modeled at this time due to inherent game engine restrictions. In the game, it’s a simple point-and-shoot periscope that requires no parameter input. The horizontal “bone” shows the projected impact point of your bombs. The dive procedure is standard.

The procedure for using Lofte 7K level bombing sight is the same as in the He-111 bomber. Please refer to previous documentation for details.

The aircraft is also equipped with rocket-assisted-take-off (RATO) packs, which give it extra boost when taking-off, and are especially needed at heavy combat loads. The RATO packs are fully automated, and cannot be interacted with by the player. They will be automatically engaged should there be the need for it, and automatically jettisoned once they are expended. The lack of player’s control is due to inherent game engine limitations.

Heinkel Lerche III

The aircraft is quipped with automatic stabilization auto-pilot that keeps the aircraft vertical during take-off and landing. The system is toggled with the “Airbrake” key. The white indicator lights on the instrument panel illuminate when the system is switched on.

Unlike most other fighters, the “Toggle Gunsight” button (Shift-F1 by default) switches the view to point downwards, at the instrument panel and the ground below.

Take-off procedure in the aircraft is simple. Toggle the stabilization auto-pilot on and slowly increase engine power. Reaching 200-300 meters of altitude push the nose down slowly to convert to horizontal flight, and disengage the stabilization auto-pilot.

The landing procedure is more involved. Firstly, select suitable area for landing. Landing approach is standard, with speeds of around 250-300 km/h, with the stabilization auto-pilot turned on (one white indicator light). At 25-30 meters of altitude begin a flare at 10 to 20 degrees nose-up attitude. The active stabilization auto-pilot will engage (second white indicator light). Level the elevators at that time. The stabilization auto-pilot will attempt to keep the aircraft vertical. Do not increase engine power at this time, as this may cause too much altitude to be gained. Do not chop the throttle below 25%, as this may lead to a stall or loss of effectiveness of the gas-powered stabilization mechanism.

After the aircraft is stabilized vertically, slowly decrease power to descent. Aircraft with expanded ammunition and low fuel will hover at approximately 35 to 40% of throttle. When descending, vertical speed of no more than 5 m/s is recommended. The aircraft is also equipped with ultra-sound altimeter, which should be used alongside the vertical speed indicator during descent.

Before touch-down decrease the vertical speed, momentarily opening the throttle. When the aircraft touches down, three green lights will illuminate on the dashboard. Immediately decrease power to avoid bunny-hopping.

When using auto-pilot, or performed by AI planes, the landing may not look smooth due to inherent game engine limitations.

X-4 Rocket

The X-4 air-to-air rocket is wire guided. All rocket-carrying aircraft (Ta-152C, Ta-183 and Heinkel Lerche III) have a single rocket control module, and as such can guide only one rocket at a time. When launching multiple rockets simultaneously, only the last rocket fired can be guided.

To guide the rocket, use the “Increase Sight Attitude”, “Decrease Sight Attitude”, “Adjust Sight Control to Right” and “Adjust Sight Control to Left” keys. We recommend assigning them to the Up, Down, Right, and Left arrow keys correspondingly.

The easiest way to guide the rocket to target is to fire from the target’s six-o-clock level while flying on the same course. Guide the rocket to keep the lights on top of the target with no visible lateral movement until the moment of impact. Use gentle taps to provide last-minute guidance. The rockets detonate remotely, so no direct impact is required.

This method should be used to attack non-maneuvering heavy bombers from 3,000 to 3,500 meters away.

NOTE: The guiding wire is not visually modeled.

Notes on modeling the aircraft, their internal systems, and armament

Due to many of the aircraft modeled having never flown in real life, we had to take a more open approach to modeling them, and use our own expertise as aviation engineers to re-examine the projects, and to apply the same type of thinking that would have been used had they really went through flight trials and went into production. This was necessary as otherwise some of the projects would simply never take to the air.

Heinkel Lerche III

We used the Heinkel Lerche II as the basis. However, after modeling the plane we’ve discovered serious deficiencies in design, and were forced to make many changes to make this plane suitable for combat. Modeled precisely to original specifications, this plane would never take off.
Correspondingly, we’ve made the following changes:
•Increased the fuselage cross-section;
•Installed more powerful supercharged engines;
•Used the details of a captured Hs-132 prototype as the basis for the cockpit;
•Replaced Hs-132’s landing gear well for an access hatch;
•Installed oil and water radiators into the circular wing;
•For take-off and landing stability, we’ve added automatic gas-powered control surfaces;
•Changed the landing gear and tail unit shape (as originally designed, the plane would fall over).

LaGG-3RD

Based on modern calculations, the projected engine power would be insufficient to reach even 700 km/h, much less the supposed 1,000 km/h listed by the original designers.
We’ve therefore had to slightly increase the engine power, to make the plane at least slightly faster than the piston-powered mid-war La-5 design.

BI-6

We’re not modeling the historical thrust difference between the two wingtip units, as this would make the plane virtually impossible to control with rudder trim. A simple decision historically would have been to place the ramjets closer to the fuselage; however we decided not to make such changes, as this would alter the aerodynamically pure original design.
We’re also not modeling the historical unreliability of starting the ramjets in-flight.

Ta-183

A captured model of the Ta-183 was tested in the TsAGI wind tunnel post war, and immediately uncovered a fatal mistake in the design. Flutter and subsequent structural failure of the tail unit began at only 700 km/h. Therefore we’ve had to artificially strengthen the tail unit by a great amount, in order to allow for the design to reach specified speeds while still keeping the famous original shape.
In reality such a redesign would have been near impossible, and most likely the tail unit would have been radically redesigned instead (such as was the case with the historical Pulqui II fighter built by Kurt Tank after the war).
In general, the plane is modeled with several concessions that were possible to make only using the knowledge gained post the 1950s.

He-162D

A forward-swept wing is well known to hold several advantages over a straight wing, such as better laminar flow, better maneuverability, etc. However not a single forward-swept wing project has entered serial production. The reason is simple: wing flutter begins much earlier with this wing than with other types. No counter-balances can solve this problem; even the common Junkers design decision of placing the engine gondolas forward can fully solve this. The decision only became possible with introduction of super-strong composite materials in the aviation industry.

Therefore, we’ve made a concession that the He-162D’s wing is also made of such composite materials, which would have historically been unavailable in 1945-46.

Ar-234

The aircraft is modeled without the manufacturing defects with balanced ailerons.
BZA-1 dive bombing sight is simplified.

I-250

Low reliability of the jet engine is not modeled.

Х-4

The modeling of the rocket is slightly idealized. The guiding wire is not visually modeled. The forces connected to the unwinding and tension of the wire are also not modeled.
In reality, the rocket was tuned to the sound of a specific aircraft engine, while in our simulator it reacts to any engine.

Askania EZ42 gyroscopic gunsight

Ta-183, Ta-152C, and potentially some other Luft’46 planes modeled in our sim were projected to use the EZ42 gyro sight, similar to the K-14 “ace-maker” used in late-war American planes.
However no detailed information about the features of the EZ42 exist, and we were forced to “install” regular sights on these planes. Even in the cockpits with 3D models visually based on the EZ42 design, they function as simple reflector sights.

Other

1. Some PCs made by the Northwood Computers Company may experience performance issues when running the game in the Perfect graphics mode. Due to issues outside of our control, the machines may lock up. Therefore, we do not recommend running the game in the Perfect mode.

In certain cases, the lock ups may be prevented by renaming the il2_core.DLL file into il2_coreP4.DLL. The files are located in the root Il-2 folder. Important: when renaming the files, make sure to save a back-up copy of the original il2_core.DLL.

2. Running this game on 91.xx series video drivers from NVidia may cause occasional graphic issues. If you encounter these issues, we recommend one of the following NVidia drivers: WinXP-81.95_WHQL; WinXP-81.94_WHQL; or WinXP-81.85_WHQL

3. Adventorous missions builders and fans of alternate history, please note that only historical carrier-borne aircraft in the sim are meant to take off from aircraft carriers when flown by the AI. Non-carrier borne aircraft in the sim may exhibit irregular behavior if still placed on aircraft carriers in full mission builder. This especially applies to VTOL aircraft (Heinkel Lerche) or any aircraft equipped with rocket engines (rocket or mixed-power). This applies to both carrier take-offs and carrier landings.

You as a player have complete freedom to try carrier ops in of our hundreds of flyable planes; in that endeavor only your skill as a pilot is the limit. However, AI aircraft and AI carrier ops have their
limitations, and unfortunately due to time constraints, and the uniqueness of the case, it was simply beyond our capacity to enable carrier ops for these planes, as the time required to achieve this
would not be justified by the goal of having such complete historical impossibilities as carrier-borne Lerche or BI-6.

Credits

Developed by
Oleg Maddox, 1C:Maddox Games and RRG Studios

Lead Developer
Ilya Shevchenko

Lead Modeler
Vladimir Kochmarsky

Kiev Map
Sergei Solovyev, Sergei Antonyuk, Vladimir Kochmarsky, Igor Pekarovskiy, Mihail Toshpulatov

Campaigns Created by
Aleksandr Timoshkov (VVS)
Ilya Shevchenko (Luftwaffe)

Campaigns Tested by
Aleksandr Timoshkov

New Skins by
Ilya Shevchenko
Erwan Roger

Cockpits
Yak-15 – Mikhail Toshpulatov, Vladimir Kochmarsky
MiG-9, I-250, Ta-183 – Ray Gruetzmacher, Filippo Tarquini
Ta-152 – Kuzma Lykov, Ray Gruetzmacher
Ar.234B-2 – Ray Gruetzmacher
Yak-3R, La-7R, BI-6 – Ilya Shevchenko
Heinkel Lerche – Roman Deniskin
Me-262 – Michel Vibert, Loic Derrien
He-162 – Luke Wallace

External Aircraft Models
Yak-3R, La-7R – Valerij Guba
Bi-6 – Ilya Shevchenko, Valerij Guba
Yak-15 – Valerij Guba, Vladimir Kochmarsky
MiG-9, Ar-234B-2, He-162D – Vladimir Kochmarsky
I-250, LaGG-3RD – Szalai Viktor
Ta-152C – Tero Tissari, Mark Show
Ta-183, He-162C, Me-262HG – Alexandr Porozov
Heinkel Lerche – Roman Deniskin
Ki-43-II - Kevin Miller, Erwan Roger

Ground Vehicles
Maus, T-44 – Vladimir Kochmarsky, Oleg Sidavsky
IS-3, Panther-II, Coelian – Vladimir Kochmarsky

Artillery
Pillboxes, M2HB – Vladimir Kochmarsky
MG-42, DShK – Ray Gruetzmacher

Buildings and Static Objects:
Alexandr Pereverzov, Vladimir Kochmarsky

Sources:

1)Evtif'ev M.D. Shturm neba. Vehi istorii reaktivnoi aviatsii. – M.: Veche, 2006.
2)Evtif'ev M.D. Ognennie kryl'ya. Istoriya sozdaniya reaktivnoi aviatsii SSSR (1930-1946). – M.: Veche, 2005.
3)Zapol'skis A.A. Reaktivnie samolety Lyuftvaffe. – M.: Harvest, 1999
4)Zefirov M.V. Shturmovaya aviatsia Lyuftvaffe. – M.: OOO «Izdatel'stvo AST», 2002.
5)Zefirov M.V. Asy Lyuftvaffe: Bombardirovochnaya aviatsia. – M.: OOO «Izdatel'stvo AST», 2002.
6)Zefirov M.V. Asy Lyuftvaffe: Reaktivnie istrebiteli. – M.: OOO «Izdatel'stvo AST», 2002.
7)Various authors. Vozdushnie voiny XX veka (1911–1945). – Smolensk: Rusich, 2002.
8)Smirnov A. Boevaya rabota sovetskoi i nemetskoi aviatsii v Velikoi Otechestvennoi voine. – M.: AST, AST Moskva, Tranzitkniga, 2006.

© 2006 Ubisoft. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006 1С. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006 1C:Maddox Games. All Rights Reserved.
© 2006 RRG Studios. All Rights Reserved.